Portraits at Weddings

Although my wedding portfolio emphasizes unposed moments, nearly all weddings also include some posed portraits, sometimes called the “formals”.  I encourage clients to schedule some time for these photos for family historical purposes.  Portraits usually include the wedding couple, their parents, immediate families and wedding party.

 

The Key Portraits

The portraits can be divided into two parts:

  1. Couple portraits — 15 minutes to 30 minutes (or more)  — varies a lot depending on the couple, the location, and how much you want to walk around. 
  2. Couple + family & wedding party portraits — 25 minutes to 60 minutes (varies a lot, depending on number of portraits, size of wedding party, size of families, etc.). For these, a good rule of thumb is 3 minutes per portrait. A typical list might look like this:
    1. couple + bride’s parents
    2. couple + bride’s family, including any grandparents & in-laws
    3. couple + all parents
    4. couple + groom’s parents
    5. couple + groom’s family, including any grandparents & in-laws
    6. bride + bridesmaids
    7. couple + wedding party (bridesmaids & groomsmen)
    8. groom + groomsmen

If you do the eight listed above, that would be (8 portraits @ 3 minutes each =) 24 minutes for the family & wedding party portion, plus the time for the couple portraits.

Each wedding is different, and each family is different.  Some have big families and big wedding parties, while some have small families and no wedding party. It’s a good idea to make a list like the above, and estimate 3 minutes per portrait on the list. If you plan to do more than the eight key portraits above, I recommend that you assign one or two people to help gather people for the portraits. Give them your portrait list so they know who to gather.

When deciding whether a portrait should be on your list, think about whether it will have a natural destination somewhere. Will it be framed and displayed by itself? Will it be in your wedding album? Would anyone miss it if it weren’t made? I don’t recommend making a list that includes many combinations of the same people. These get repetitive for everyone involved, especially the wedding couple!  If time is short, it’s best to go with fewer portraits, while including more people in each. For example, while it may be nice to have a portrait of the bride separately with each parent and the groom separately with each parent, the essential portrait (likely to get framed or be in the album) is the couple with each set of parents, or the couple with all parents.

Of course, be sure to ask for any portraits that are important for you. For example, a portrait of just your parents may be lovely to have, even if it’s not going to be in the album. They may even expect such a portrait. If so, be sure to put it on your list.

Note that many weddings run behind schedule, so it’s a good idea to pad the schedule with extra time, just in case that happens.

Here are some examples of the key portraits at one wedding:

Bride and Groom
Bride and Groom with Bride’s Parents
Bride and Groom with Groom’s Parents
Bride and Groom with Bride’s Family
Bride and Groom with Wedding Party
Bride and Groom with Wedding Party (a little less formal)

 


Other Possible Portraits and How They Affect the Schedule

If you would like more portraits, be sure to schedule more time. A list of five portraits may take just 15 minutes to complete, while a list of 30 portraits may realistically take 90 minutes. If you have more time, here are just some of the many possible variations:

Bride with Bridesmaids
Groom with Groomsmen
Bride with Maid of Honor
Bride with Bridesmaid
Bride with Bride’s Family
Bride with Mother
Bride’s Parents
Bride and Groom with Bride’s extended Family
Bride and Groom with Groom’s extended Family
Group photo during cocktail hour
Family group photo during cocktail hour (large group photos inevitably take some time while key people are found and assembled)
Family group photo during cocktail hour (large group photos inevitably take some time while key people are found and assembled)

 


 Examples of Portraits from Various Weddings

The above examples are all from one wedding. Let’s look at some examples of portraits from other weddings:

Bride and Bridesmaids

Of course, portraits sometimes have fun “in-between” moments:

Bride and Bridesmaids
Bride and Groom with Groom’s Family
Bride and Groom with Bride’s Family
Bride and Groom
Bride and Groom
Groom and Bride
Groom and Bride
Bride and Bridesmaid
Bride with Sisters
Bride
Bride and Bridesmaids
Bride and Bridesmaids
Groom and Groomsmen
Groom and Groomsmen
Bride and Groom with Wedding Party
Bride and Groom with Wedding Party
Bride and Groom with Bride’s Parents and extended Family

 


Wedding Portraits Indoors

The above examples are all outdoors and in daylight. Outdoors is generally preferable, but wedding portraits can also be done indoors. Sometimes the weather is a factor, or the sunset is early, or indoors is just more practical. Here are some examples of indoor wedding portraits:

Bride
Bride and Bridesmaids
Bride’s Mother and Bride
Bride with Bridesmaids
Bride and Groom with Wedding Party
Bride and Groom with their Parents
Bride and Groom with Bride’s Family
Bride and Groom with Nieces and Nephews
Bride and Groom with Bride’s extended Family

 


Wedding Portraits in Black and White

Wedding portraits are usually in color but can also be in black and white:

Groom and Groomsmen
Bride and Groom with Groomsmen

 


 

Wedding Portraits Without Looking at the Camera

Wedding portraits are often of people looking toward the camera, but may also have the subjects looking at each other:

Bride and Groom

Or looking away:

Bride

See also:

Wedding Portraits Portfolio


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